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Posts tagged ‘Ca’n Joan de S’Aigo’

Norms at the Chocolateria C’an Joan de S’Aigo

Having read my post a few days back on the oldest and most venerable of all chocolateria’s in Palma de Mallorca, the C’an Joan de S’Aigo, it was only a matter of time before the Norms sought out the establishment for themselves. Pearly white though they may be, these little one-armed creatures love nothing more than a cup of warm silky chocolate, which helps to nourish their gelatinous skin, and gives them an extra spring to their bounce. So off the Norms went to Palma’s most popular cafe, nestled in the streets of its ancient medieval quarter, and still exhibiting an eclectic mix of interior articles from a bygone era.

On the visit we see in this little Norm sketch, these hungry Norms have ventured into the cafe at a fortuitous time. For not only have they been able to find themselves plenty of greasy sweet ensaimadas to dip into their hot chocolate, but they have also coincided their visit with that of Joan Miro Norm, the great Norm artist who himself always loved to indulge in a little cup of the good stuff. Here we can see Miro Norm somewhat struggling with a piece of art work. Should he draw another bird or another star? Is the black outline around the yellow circle thick enough? It’s a real struggle being an artist – I can tell you that much.

Norms visit the C'an Joan de S'Aigo (2014 © Nicholas de Lacy-Brown, pen and ink on paper)

Norms visit the C’an Joan de S’Aigo (2014 © Nicholas de Lacy-Brown, pen and ink on paper)

© Nicholas de Lacy-Brown and The Daily Norm, 2001-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of the material, whether written work, photography or artwork, included within The Daily Norm without express and written permission from The Daily Norm’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Nicholas de Lacy-Brown and The Daily Norm with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. For more information on the work of Nicholas de Lacy-Brown, head to his art website at www.delacy-brown.com

Miro’s Chocolateria: the C’an Joan de S’Aigo

If it was good enough for Joan Miro, then it is certainly good enough for me… For the C’an Joan de S’Aigo is a café with a venerable history and a list of clientele past and present so long that it can probably count all of Mallorca’s most famous residents among its number, including the great artist Miro himself. Nestled within the maze of nostalgic alleyways which make up the oldest core of Palma’s centre, the C’an Joan de S’Aigo was founded in 1700 and as such is Palma’s oldest eatery. Founded when the cafe’s namesake had the idea of bringing down ice from the Tramuntana mountains and serving it richly flavoured in the earliest form of ice cream, the C’an Joan de S’Aigo is today equally famous for its rich pickings of local pastries and steaming hot chocolate.

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Despite the age of this quaint faded café, the locals of Palma have never allowed it to go out of fashion: When we sampled the café after our dip in the sea last weekend, it came after several failed attempts to visit previously – for each time we have been along, the place has heaved with locals who head to the café at the traditional merienda hour to sample ice cream piled high from small glasses and creamy indulgent hot chocolate. But it was worth the wait. Sat amongst the traditional interiors packed with blue and white ceramics, colourful glass chandeliers, copper kettles, filigree vases and wooden thrones, we feasted greedily on a sampling of the cafe’s local pastries, all of which tasted all the better when coated with a velvety layer of that legendary hot chocolate.

For Dominik, a sweet bun made, surprisingly, of potatoes (coca de patata) was a light and fluffy counter to the liquid silk of chocolate steaming in a cup before him. For me, a richer, creamier ensaïmada – the local specialist pastry which you can find all over town and which tourists buy in their plenty in what resemble giant hat boxes. Made in Mallorca even before the C’an Joan de S’Aigo was founded, the ensaïmada is made from dough which has been repeatedly folded with pork fat – much like puff pastry – and then either served sprinkled with sugar, or filled with other such goodies. And my filling of cold custard oozed and melted as it dipped into the hot chocolate with as much unctuous delight as melted butter on a warm crumpet. 

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Thoroughly disgusted by our self-indulgence, but rather rewarded by our dip into local culture, we swiftly decided that a visit to C’an Joan de S’Aigo must become a weekly tradition. How else can one become integrated into Mallorquin society?

The C’an Joan de S’Aigo café can be found hidden away just off from the church of Santa Eulalia on the Carrer Can Sanc 10. It’s open daily 8am-9pm except Tuesdays.